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An expert on Seattle’s experience will address 2 Hawaii events

HONOLULU, Feb. 23, 2020 >> Proposals to increase Hawaii’s minimum wage are back on the docket at the state Legislature, in an effort to make our state more affordable. And who doesn’t want that? It’s an attractive idea, but what could go wrong?

To help answer that question, the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii is sponsoring two luncheons in March at which Jacob Vigdor, a professor of public policy and governance at the University of Washington, will talk about what resulted in Seattle after 2014 when it became the first big city in the United States to start raising its minimum wage over a period of several years to $15 an hour.

Vigdor and his colleagues conducted a comprehensive analysis of the city’s new wage structure and found that the costs outweighed the benefits.

If you would like to hear more about how minimum-wage legislation harms the very people it is meant to help, and what Hawaii lawmakers could be recommending instead to bring down Hawaii’s high cost of living, please join us for these two important events. Both will be moderated by Keli’i Akina, president and CEO of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii.

The first of the two luncheons is scheduled for Monday, March 23, at Cafe Julia in the Honolulu YWCA, 1040 Richards St. Admission is $25 and includes a luncheon buffet. Paid parking will be available at Ali‘i Place. 

The second is on Tuesday, March 24, at the Maui Country Club in Paia. Admission is $10 and includes a luncheon buffet and parking.

For more information, please call 808-591-9193 or email info@grassrootinstitute.org.

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The Grassroot Institute of Hawaii is an independent 501(c)(3) nonprofit research and educational institution that seeks to lower the cost of living and increase opportunities in Hawaii by promoting individual liberty, economic freedom and limited, accountable government.