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Reform to Protect the First Amendment

President Donald Trump set off yet another political firestorm when he promised to “totally destroy” the Johnson Amendment, which bars ministers from endorsing candidates from the pulpit. Doing so risks their churches’ tax exemption. The provision was advanced by Sen. (and later President) Lyndon Johnson and applies to all 501(c)(3)

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Should All Flyers Go First Class?

Anyone who flies, or, at least, anyone who isn’t rich who flies, probably wishes he or she had more leg room. Going “cattle class” isn’t fun. But for most people it still is better than not going. Which for most travelers is the real alternative. For decades the Civil Aeronautics

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America’s Persistently Dependent Allies

The U.S. is allied with every major industrialized power on the planet. America’s friends in Asia and Europe generally are prosperous and populous. Yet decades after the conflicts which led to Washington’s security guarantees for them, the allied gaggle remains a bunch of “losers,” to paraphrase Donald Trump. Last week

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Restarting India’s Faltering Economic Revolution

The sharp defeat of Narendra Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party in the state of Bihar has put the prime minister’s reform plan and political legacy at risk. He still has time to act, but governments usually grow more timid the longer they hold office. A trading people who had succeeded at

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Can China’s Authoritarians Keep the Economic Miracle Going?

BEIJING—Mao Zedong, China’s “Great Helmsman,” died four decades ago. Only after his murderous reign finally ended could his nation move forward. The old dictator and his cronies wouldn’t recognize China’s capital today. Beijing has become a sprawling metropolis with night clubs and fast food restaurants. Shanghai’s transformation is equally dramatic.

Read More →

Dominican Republic Threatens Ethnic War against Haiti—and America

Haitians voted for a new president last month. A run-off looms, but whoever wins will face overwhelming challenges. What’s worse, the Dominican Republic, which shares the island of Hispaniola, is threatening to expel hundreds of thousands of ethnic Haitians. They ultimately could spill over America’s borders. Haiti was liberated in

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I’m from the Government and I’m Here to Help You—Again!

Most everyone believes that government is an essential institution, necessary to do what people cannot do on their own. And that sounds like a pretty good justification for the state. But it rarely describes what government actually does. For instance, late last year Rachel Kennedy wanted to bring a Cuban

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China: Historic Empire Transformed, Fragile Leader In The Making?

SHANGHAI, CHINA—Shanghai, China’s financial capital, enjoys a double skyline. The city proper, or “old city,” sports a fascinating mix of colonial buildings and modern architecture. The “New Area” of Pudong hosts Shanghai’s four tallest structures, on the east bank of the Huangpu River. In contrast, when I first visited Shanghai

Read More →

Reform to Protect the First Amendment

President Donald Trump set off yet another political firestorm when he promised to “totally destroy” the Johnson Amendment, which bars ministers from endorsing candidates from the pulpit. Doing so risks their churches’ tax exemption. The provision was advanced by Sen. (and later President) Lyndon Johnson and applies to all 501(c)(3)

Read More →

Should All Flyers Go First Class?

Anyone who flies, or, at least, anyone who isn’t rich who flies, probably wishes he or she had more leg room. Going “cattle class” isn’t fun. But for most people it still is better than not going. Which for most travelers is the real alternative. For decades the Civil Aeronautics

Read More →

America’s Persistently Dependent Allies

The U.S. is allied with every major industrialized power on the planet. America’s friends in Asia and Europe generally are prosperous and populous. Yet decades after the conflicts which led to Washington’s security guarantees for them, the allied gaggle remains a bunch of “losers,” to paraphrase Donald Trump. Last week

Read More →

Restarting India’s Faltering Economic Revolution

The sharp defeat of Narendra Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party in the state of Bihar has put the prime minister’s reform plan and political legacy at risk. He still has time to act, but governments usually grow more timid the longer they hold office. A trading people who had succeeded at

Read More →

Can China’s Authoritarians Keep the Economic Miracle Going?

BEIJING—Mao Zedong, China’s “Great Helmsman,” died four decades ago. Only after his murderous reign finally ended could his nation move forward. The old dictator and his cronies wouldn’t recognize China’s capital today. Beijing has become a sprawling metropolis with night clubs and fast food restaurants. Shanghai’s transformation is equally dramatic.

Read More →

Dominican Republic Threatens Ethnic War against Haiti—and America

Haitians voted for a new president last month. A run-off looms, but whoever wins will face overwhelming challenges. What’s worse, the Dominican Republic, which shares the island of Hispaniola, is threatening to expel hundreds of thousands of ethnic Haitians. They ultimately could spill over America’s borders. Haiti was liberated in

Read More →

I’m from the Government and I’m Here to Help You—Again!

Most everyone believes that government is an essential institution, necessary to do what people cannot do on their own. And that sounds like a pretty good justification for the state. But it rarely describes what government actually does. For instance, late last year Rachel Kennedy wanted to bring a Cuban

Read More →

China: Historic Empire Transformed, Fragile Leader In The Making?

SHANGHAI, CHINA—Shanghai, China’s financial capital, enjoys a double skyline. The city proper, or “old city,” sports a fascinating mix of colonial buildings and modern architecture. The “New Area” of Pudong hosts Shanghai’s four tallest structures, on the east bank of the Huangpu River. In contrast, when I first visited Shanghai

Read More →