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Accountability

Blowing the whistle on HART

It’s difficult to protect workplace whistleblowers if intimidation is present in the very place where they would blow their proverbial whistles. But that is what appears to be happening at the Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation (HART), which has been undergoing an audit on behalf of the Hawaii state Legislature.

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Holding the state accountable

I’m delighted to let you know that The Wall Street Journal has just published exclusive research by the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii. Our story on how the Hawaii state government encouraged the building of homes in the currently erupting lava zones has now gone national! This is an example of

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Restoring accountability at the Capitol

In theory, the legislative session is a time when complex issues can be hashed out in full view of the public. Citizens are free to testify and offer feedback to legislators about proposed bills. Legislators can research and debate the possible impact. Hearings are held. Compromises are found. In theory,

Read More →

How much privacy for public employees?

Transparency is a difficult area for politicians and policymakers. Typically they profess to understand the value of open government, but it’s astounding how quickly they can carve out exceptions to withhold information from the public. Consider HB1768, a bill currently working its way through the state Legislature. If enacted, it

Read More →

Bureaucracy thwarts state modernization

Hawaii’s entrenched state and county bureaucracies have long been blamed for many things, and delaying the advance of high technology into their own operations is definitely one of them. Repeated failures in trying to upgrade the payroll and other technology systems with which they operate has cost Hawaii taxpayers probably

Read More →

Competition matters…in sports and in government

Imagine a football game in which there is only one team playing. Instead of seeing dazzling plays, the entire game is spent watching that one team sprint down the field and score over and over again. The winning team might glory in the score, but for the crowd, there’s an

Read More →

A Federal Appeals Court Slaps Obama’s Hand and Then Does Nothing

One more overreach from our “constitutional scholar” in the Oval Office was just shot down. In this case, a three-judge panel on the DC Court of Appeals ruled the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is “unconstitutionally structured” and must be restructured. But the court’s temporary remedy doesn’t actually change anything,

Read More →

Individual Accountability Must be Across the Board

“Feds to target Wall Street’s finance felons” proclaims a story headline in the Star-Advertiser. The article quotes a Justice Department memo, “It’s only fair that the people who are responsible for committing those crimes be held accountable.” What’s new about that? The answer is nothing in theory but lots in

Read More →

Blowing the whistle on HART

It’s difficult to protect workplace whistleblowers if intimidation is present in the very place where they would blow their proverbial whistles. But that is what appears to be happening at the Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation (HART), which has been undergoing an audit on behalf of the Hawaii state Legislature.

Read More →

Holding the state accountable

I’m delighted to let you know that The Wall Street Journal has just published exclusive research by the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii. Our story on how the Hawaii state government encouraged the building of homes in the currently erupting lava zones has now gone national! This is an example of

Read More →

Restoring accountability at the Capitol

In theory, the legislative session is a time when complex issues can be hashed out in full view of the public. Citizens are free to testify and offer feedback to legislators about proposed bills. Legislators can research and debate the possible impact. Hearings are held. Compromises are found. In theory,

Read More →

How much privacy for public employees?

Transparency is a difficult area for politicians and policymakers. Typically they profess to understand the value of open government, but it’s astounding how quickly they can carve out exceptions to withhold information from the public. Consider HB1768, a bill currently working its way through the state Legislature. If enacted, it

Read More →

Bureaucracy thwarts state modernization

Hawaii’s entrenched state and county bureaucracies have long been blamed for many things, and delaying the advance of high technology into their own operations is definitely one of them. Repeated failures in trying to upgrade the payroll and other technology systems with which they operate has cost Hawaii taxpayers probably

Read More →

Competition matters…in sports and in government

Imagine a football game in which there is only one team playing. Instead of seeing dazzling plays, the entire game is spent watching that one team sprint down the field and score over and over again. The winning team might glory in the score, but for the crowd, there’s an

Read More →

A Federal Appeals Court Slaps Obama’s Hand and Then Does Nothing

One more overreach from our “constitutional scholar” in the Oval Office was just shot down. In this case, a three-judge panel on the DC Court of Appeals ruled the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is “unconstitutionally structured” and must be restructured. But the court’s temporary remedy doesn’t actually change anything,

Read More →

Individual Accountability Must be Across the Board

“Feds to target Wall Street’s finance felons” proclaims a story headline in the Star-Advertiser. The article quotes a Justice Department memo, “It’s only fair that the people who are responsible for committing those crimes be held accountable.” What’s new about that? The answer is nothing in theory but lots in

Read More →